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Farhat Rams
Farhat Rams

Bunch Together


Toward the end of The Great Gatsby, Nick is starting to get majorly fed up with all the nonsense going down on the Eggs. After he gets the full scoop on Gatsby's background (and his tragic love affair with Daisy), he tells Gatsby, "You're worth the whole damn bunch put together."




bunch together



You can quickly perform tasks on multiple worksheets at the same time by grouping worksheets together. If you group a set of worksheets, any changes you make on one worksheet are made in all the other worksheets in the group in the exact same location on the worksheets. If you want to create, for example, standard tables or calculations on a large number of worksheets, grouping can save you a lot of time. This works best if the worksheets already have identical data structures.


In public transport, bus bunching, clumping, convoying, piggybacking or platooning is a phenomenon whereby two or more transit vehicles (such as buses or trains) that were scheduled at regular intervals along a common route instead bunch together and form a platoon. This occurs when leading vehicles are unable to keep their schedule and fall behind to such an extent that trailing vehicles catch up to them.


A bus that is running slightly late will, in addition to its normal load, pick up passengers who would have taken the next bus if the first bus had not been late. These extra passengers delay the first bus even further. In contrast, the bus behind the late bus has a lighter passenger load than it otherwise would have, and may therefore run ahead of schedule. The classical theory causal model for irregular intervals is based on the observation that a late bus tends to get later and later as it completes its run, while the bus following it tends to get earlier and earlier. Eventually these buses form a pair, one right after another, and the service deteriorates as the headway degrades from its nominal value. The buses that are stuck together are called a bus bunch or banana bus; this may also involve more than two buses. This effect is often theorised to be the primary cause of reliability problems on bus and metro systems.


Simulation studies have successfully demonstrated the extent of possible factors influencing bus bunching, and they may also be used to understand the impact of actions taken to overcome negative effects of bunching.[1]


Understanding how the weather and climate change is one of the most important challenges in science today. A new theoretical study from associate professor, Jan Härter, at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, presents a new mechanism for the self-aggregation of storm clouds, a phenomenon, by which storm clouds bunch together in dense clusters. The researcher used methods from complexity science, and applied them to formerly established research in meteorology on the behavior of thunderstorm clouds. The study is now published in Geophysical Research Letters.


With grouping in Power BI Desktop, you can group visuals together in your report, such as buttons, textboxes, shapes, images, and any visual you create, just like you group items in PowerPoint. Grouping visuals in a report lets you treat the group like a single object, making moving, resizing, and working with layers in your report easier, faster, and more intuitive.


Free thesaurus definition of to meet together as a group from the Macmillan English Dictionary - a free English dictionary online with thesaurus and with pronunciation from Macmillan Education.


As this is a group writing handout, several Writing Center coaches worked together to create it. No coaches were harmed in this process; however, we did experience both the pros and the cons of the collaborative process. We have personally tested the various methods for sharing files and scheduling meetings that are described here. However, these are only our suggestions; we do not advocate any particular service or site.


Not everyone enjoys working in groups. You may truly desire to go solo on this project, and you may even be capable of doing a great job on your own. However, if this is a group assignment, then the prompt is asking for everyone to participate. If you are feeling the need to take over everything, try discussing expectations with your fellow group members as well as the teaching assistant or professor. However, always address your concerns with group members first. Try to approach the group project as a learning experiment: you are learning not only about the project material but also about how to motivate others and work together.


Atli gets a lot of satisfaction out of the fact that people come together through Bunch to play the games that they love, even when they are physically apart. It helps people enjoy group video chat while playing multiplayer games with friends.


Additionally, users can play third-party games that are lightly supported on Bunch like PUBG Mobile, Minecraft, and UNO. With these games, players can still party up on video chat through Bunch and open those games together while still talking to each other. However, with these titles, the users will have to manually party up to play together when they are inside the game.


If you find yourself using the same set of blocks together quite frequently, you can group them together and save the Group block as a reusable block. This lets you quickly and easily insert the same set of blocks again all at once, instead of adding each block one at a time.


With outdoor social cycling time either non-existent or pared down to an absolute minimum for many right now, it\u2019s never been more important to know how to interact with your riding buddies digitally. Cafe rides, club-runs and early-season sportives have been replaced by online meet-ups and chats.\u00a0\nIn these strange times, even anti-social time trialists like yours truly have abandoned training plans in favour of virtual social rides, and with so many people now on Zwift it\u2019s an ideal platform to meet up on.\nOf course, like in real life, you can just agree to meet your friends at a certain time and place in the virtual world, but there are other, more sophisticated ways to organise group rides too.\nAs with any piece of tech though, there are a few tips and tricks to get the most out of it \u2013 and a couple of things to avoid doing altogether. Here are our top tips and tricks to riding with your friends on Zwift.\nDon\u2019t worry if Zwift isn\u2019t your flavour, take a look at our round-up of best indoor cycling apps available right now.\n\n Virtual riding with your friends is a great way to socialise in these strange times. Zwift\nHow to ride with friends on Zwift\u00a0\nIf you want to ride with just one of your friends, the easiest way to do so is via the \u2018Join another Zwifter\u2019 function. You can find this in the in-game start screen, just after you\u2019ve paired your devices. \nZwifters you follow (you can follow Zwifters using the \u2018Find Zwifters\u2019 function on the Zwift Companion app) will appear at the top of the list, so all you need to do is select their name and click the big orange \u2018Ride With\u2019 button at the bottom of the screen.\nThis will automatically place you next to the selected person in the game, and will also tether you to them for a few seconds so you can get up to their speed.\nBe warned though, the tethering function really does only last a few seconds, so if you happen to be friends with someone like Geraint Thomas you\u2019ll have to work quite hard to keep up.\nZwift events and group rides\nAnother way to ride with your friends is to join one of the events, group rides, group workouts or races available in the game.\nThere\u2019s a wide range of options, in terms of time, world map, course, etc. All you and your friends need to do is sign up for the same event.\nThe upside of this is that someone else does all the work for you, all you have to do is find the event on the event calendar or via the Zwift Companion app, then turn up.\nAlternatively, if you haven\u2019t planned ahead but still want someone to ride with, Zwift has four Pace Partners. These bots roam Watopia at predetermined power outputs, and there\u2019s almost always a large bunch of Zwifter\u2019s riding with them, so you can jump straight into a group ride for as little or as long as you like, at any time of the day.\nFor more info on Pace Partners, head over to our complete guide to Zwift.\n\n Some routes on Zwift, such as Alpe du Zwift, are level locked in general play. If you\u2019re not the right level and still want to ride them, join a group workout or event. Simon Bromley \/ Immediate Media\nZwift Meetups explained\nThe disadvantage of joining events is that you may also be joined by hundreds of other Zwifters, making it hard to be sociable with just the people you know.\nThis is where the Meetups function comes into its own. It allows you to create private group rides that are invitation only.\nTo create a Meetup, head to the events page on the Zwift Companion app and click the group icon (next to the bike \/ run icons) near the top of the page. \u2018Create Meetup\u2019 will appear in an orange bar just underneath and you\u2019ll be guided through a few simple steps.\nSimply select the date and time to schedule the ride, where you want to ride and for how long. You can then use the \u2018Customize Your Meetup\u2019 drop-down menu to select whether to automatically \u2018Keep Everyone Together\u2019 (more on this feature later) or to officially make it a race, by selecting to display \u2018Race Results\u2019 at the end of the ride.\nThen you simply need to select who you want to invite \u2013 you can invite anyone who\u2019s following you, and up to 100 people per ride.\nZwift has also recently added an option to hide other Zwifters from the view of everyone in the Meetup, called Meetup-Only View. When this is selected, only Zwifters in your group will appear on screen and leaderboards will be filtered so your group can compete for leader\u2019s jerseys.\nThis can be particularly useful if you plan to ride on a popular course at a busy time because the general traffic of other Zwifters can make it confusing to work out who is and isn\u2019t in your group. That said, if you\u2019re riding a quieter course, leaving this option turned off does help make the world feel more alive and immersive, especially if your group is a small one.\nOnce set up, invitees will receive a notification in the Zwift Companion app where they can respond \u201cGoing\u201d or \u201cNot going\u201d.\nAll you then need to do to attend the ride is log in to Zwift a few minutes before the scheduled start time. The game will automatically transport you and everyone else to the start of the group ride with a few minutes to go.\n\n You can schedule group rides quickly and easily via the Zwift Companion app. Simon Bromley \/ Immediate Media\nFour tips to create the perfect virtual group ride\nSince social distancing rules and guidelines have come into effect, the BikeRadar team has been scheduling and attending regular group rides on Zwift. \nAlthough we\u2019re fortunate to still be able to ride outside in the UK, everything else is off the table for the time being, so virtual group rides have become a lifeline for staying connected.\nThese are our top tips to make your Zwift group ride as good as a real one.\n1. To tether or not to tether\nOne of the key options to pay attention to with Meetups is the \u2018Keep Everyone Together\u2019 option under \u2018Customize Your Meetup\u2019.\nSelecting this tethers your Meetup group together throughout the ride, regardless of differences in power output between riders. As long as you keep pedalling, the game will keep you in the group.\nThis is really useful if you have a group of riders of differing abilities because it can enable everyone to ride at a comfortable pace and keep it genuinely sociable.\nIf you fancy a more competitive ride, or simply want your buddies to keep up with the group of their own accord, then you can leave this option blank.\n\n The tethering function allows people of varying abilities to ride together at a comfortable pace, but if you want to encourage some friendly competition, leave this option blank or select to display \u2018race results\u2019. Simon Bromley \/ Immediate Media\n2. You can join up to 30 minutes late, unless it\u2019s a race.\nIn real life, there is always at least one person who\u2019s late for the group ride\u2026 And on Zwift it\u2019s no different.\nFortunately, Zwift has recently added the ability for riders to join a Meetup up to 30 minutes after the scheduled start time. So, if you\u2019re running late, just log on as normal, and Zwift will offer you the option to join the Meetup as long as you accepted the invitation before the scheduled start time.\nIf the ride organiser has selected to show \u2018race results\u2019 from the ride, however, you won\u2019t be able to join the Meetup after it\u2019s started. After all, it\u2019s not a fair race if some people join half way through.\n3. Have a chat\nOne of the best things about riding in a group is the opportunity to catch up with friends, chew the fat and make all your excuses in advance of getting dropped on the hills.\nIf you\u2019re playing Zwift on a PC\/Mac, you can hit \u2018M\u2019 to open up the message dialogue. Simply type your message and press Enter, and everyone close-by will see your message pop up as a chat bubble next to your name on the \u2018Zwifters nearby\u2019 panel.\nIf you\u2019re playing on Android or iOS, you can tap the screen to bring up the menu bar, then tap the chat box icon to send a message.\nAlternatively, you can use the Zwift Companion app to send messages to nearby Zwifters or privately, via the Direct Message option.\nAn added benefit of using the Zwift Companion app is being able to use the speech to text function. If there\u2019s a little microphone icon on the keyboard you can tap that and dictate a message, the app will then automatically convert it to text.\n\n Getting some kind of chat going, whether via text in-game or voice chat on an external platform, is key to making your group ride a social event. Simon Bromley \/ Immediate Media\nFor a more immersive experience you might want voice chat, but there\u2019s sadly no in-game function for that at the moment. There are plenty of free conference calling options online that you could try however, but you\u2019ll need to organise those separately.\nWe\u2019d absolutely recommend doing so though, because it makes a huge difference in making your virtual group ride feel more like one you\u2019d do outside. It\u2019s quite difficult to have a proper chat using the text messaging options, and fumbling around for your phone and laptop during a ride can be a bit unwieldy too (especially if you\u2019re finding the pace tough).\nThe BikeRadar team has been using Slack to host our ride chats (both for voice chat during rides and general chit chat day-to-day), but free services such as Discord, Skype, Messenger and WhatsApp also offer similar functionality.\nMost of these services offer video streaming capabilities too, but that will put extra pressure on your internet connection that could compromise the game\u2019s performance.\u00a0\nAll you\u2019re likely to see is your topless, sweaty friends breathing heavily in a small room, so it might not be worth it anyway.\n4. Ride in BikeRadar kit\nOf course, we class all of our readers as dear friends, so you can unlock the BikeRadar kit for your avatar using the promo code \u201cBIKERADAR\u201d. Just follow these instructions.\nIt won\u2019t cost you anything and we\u2019ll be sure to give you an e-wave or a Ride On if we see you out on the virtual roads.\n\n Once you\u2019ve unlocked the BikeRadar kit on Zwift, you can select it in your in-game garage. Simon Bromley \/ Immediate Media","image":"@type":"ImageObject","url":"https:\/\/images.immediate.co.uk\/production\/volatile\/sites\/21\/2020\/04\/Screenshot-2020-04-02-at-18.54.32_CROP-588cebf.jpg?quality=90&resize=768,574","width":768,"height":574,"headline":"How to host your own Zwift MeetUp to ride with friends","author":["@type":"Person","name":"Simon von Bromley"],"publisher":"@type":"Organization","name":"BikeRadar","url":"https:\/\/www.bikeradar.com","logo":"@type":"ImageObject","url":"https:\/\/images.immediate.co.uk\/production\/volatile\/sites\/21\/2019\/03\/cropped-White-Orange-da60b0b-04d8ff9.png?quality=90&resize=265,53","width":182,"height":60,"speakable":"@type":"SpeakableSpecification","xpath":["\/html\/head\/title","\/html\/head\/meta[@name='description']\/@content"],"url":"https:\/\/www.bikeradar.com\/advice\/fitness-and-training\/zwift-group-rides\/","datePublished":"2021-01-19T19:00:00+00:00","dateModified":"2021-10-20T10:16:00+00:00"}] How to host your own Zwift MeetUp to ride with friends Meetups, group rides and social Zwifting explained 041b061a72


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